Palazzo Pubblico


The Siena Duomo

         The Mosaic floor and the Porta del Cielo

         The cript


Ospedale Santa Maria della Scala


Palazzo Piccolomini | Archivio di Stato di Siena


Basilica dei Servi


Some of the best Restaurants in Siena 


Food shopping addresses in Siena


L’Orto de’Pecci


The Palio


Foundation of Siena


Sienese School of Painting


Fonti di Siena

 

The Siena area


Album Palio di Siena


Video Palio di Siena

 

 

 

 

 





 
Il Palio di Siena

Capitoline Wolf at Siena Duomo.jpg

 

Capitoline Wolf at Siena Duomo. According to a legend Siena was founded by Senius and Aschius, two sons of Remus. When they fled Rome, they took the statue of She-wolf to Siena, which became a symbol of the town [1]


Toacana ] Galleria di immagini  
     
   
Siena | The foundation of Siena
   
   

The legend has it that Siena was established by Senius, son of Remus and nephew of Romulus. Therefore the symbol of Siena is a she-wolf breastfeeding Romulus and Remus. This symbol has been repeated in different parts of town and pieces of art.

 

   
   

One of the earliest panels in the inlaid mosaic floor of the Cathedral, the She-Wolf of Siena

 

The legend of Aschius and Senius


According to a local legend, the city of Siena was founded by a pair of twins named Aschius and Senius. When they were very young, their wicked uncle murdered their father and usurped his throne, so they fled into the forest on two horses, one white and one black. There the two young boys survived by being suckled by a she-wolf, and when they grew up they founded a city called Siena, after Senius; they took the she-wolf as the symbol of their city, and the colors of the horses as their banner. The legend has proved extremely resilient: the she-wolf is a vivid presence all over the city of Siena even today, and the half-white/half-black balzana still takes pride of place as the city's standard during the Palio, the traditional horse race run in the main square of Siena twice every summer. That said, the story will sound eerily — even comically — familiar to readers acquainted with Roman history, since it mimics in almost every detail the famous legend of the founding of Rome (as narrated, for example, in Livy's Ab urbe condita). Only the horses are lacking in the Roman version: Romulus and Remus, the heirs of the city of Alba Longa, were hunted from the city by their wicked great-uncle Amulius, who killed their grandfather Numitor and usurped his throne. Abandoned in the wilderness, they were suckled by a she-wolf, and when they grew up they founded the city of Rome.

 


Siena. c. 1410. Bronze wolf by Giovanni di Turino on a classical column outside the Palazzo Pubblico, Siena. 1427




Ambrogio Lorenzetti, fresco in
Siena, Palazzo Publico, Sala dei Nove, Allegory of Good Government (detail), with the wolf and twins at his feet

 

According to the Roman legend, the twins then quarreled, and Romulus killed Remus -- which is where the two legends merge, because according to the Sienese, history repeated itself in the younger pair of twins. Aschius and Senius were the sons of Remus, who were forced to flee because their uncle Romulus had killed their father.  

 
 
   

Galleria fotografica Siena

Siena | Galleria fotografica

 

   
Spedale di Santa Maria della Scala   Spedale di Santa Maria della Scala (facciata)  

Piazza del Campo, Il Campo, seen from the top of Torre del Mangia

Siena, Ospedalei Santa Maria della Scala  

Spedale di Santa Maria della Scala (facciata)

 

 

Piazza del Campo, visto dalla cima di Torre del Mangia

 

Panorama del Terzo di Città dalla Torre del Mangia   Palazzo Sansedoni Siena   Palazzo Sansedoni
Panorama del Terzo di Città dalla Torre del Mangia  

Palazzo Sansedoni

 

  Palazzo Sansedoni

Holiday accommodation Tuscany

 

Podere Santa Pia, un incantevole casa vacanze nel cuore della Maremma meridionale

 


 


[1] Foto by Petar Miloševi? licenziato in base ai termini della licenza Creative Commons Attribuzione-Condividi allo stesso modo 4.0 Internazionale